FAQ

In-Lab Sleep Study

  • What is a sleep study?
    A simple, painless overnight procedure that monitors your brain waves, muscle activity, leg movements, heart rhythms and other body functions while you sleep. It is monitored by a highly-skilled sleep technologist.
  • Will I need to take time off of work for a sleep study?
    This should not be necessary. A patient’s study usually begins in the evening and is completed before 7am enabling the patient to go to work following the sleep study. If you work a night shift or unusual hours, we will make arrangements for the study to be conducted during your normal sleep hours.
  • Will my insurance cover my sleep study?
    Most major insurance companies, as well as Medicare, provide coverage for sleep studies. As with any medical procedure, it is a good idea to verify coverage with your insurance company before scheduling a sleep study appointment.
  • How should I prepare for my sleep study?
    Most sleep study appointments are scheduled to begin around 8-9pm. You should eat dinner before you arrive and follow your physician’s directions concerning prescription medications.

    Before your arrival, please take a shower and wash and dry your hair to remove all of the natural oils and dry skin from your body. Avoid applying makeup or using any hair products, as electrodes will be applied to your face and scalp, requiring it to be clean.

  • What do I need to bring to the sleep study?
    • Please pack an overnight bag with your insurance card, completed forms (if appropriate), reading glasses, hearing aids, dentures, sleepwear, toiletries, a change of clothes, and bedtime reading material if needed. You may also bring a laptop or movies if you would like.
    •  If you are diabetic, please be sure to bring whatever you need.
    • If you are on home oxygen or you do breathing treatments, it is your responsibility to bring that equipment. Please notify us before your appointment and we will be happy to help you arrange this with your home health company.
    • If you use a special pillow, such as a cervical pillow, please bring it.
    • You are welcome to bring a non-caffeinated drink and a snack. We have a refrigerator and microwave at the facility.
  • What should I wear?
    Please wear loose fitting clothing, preferably pajamas with top and bottom or shorts and a T-Shirt. For liability reasons we can’t allow patients to sleep in the nude or in their undergarments.
  • Is there anything I shouldn’t do?
    • Please avoid alcohol, caffeine and napping the day of the study.
    • Try to avoid using all hair products except shampoo the day of the study.
    • Please avoid the use of makeup, ointments, and lotion the day of study.
    • Don’t take over the counter medications, such as Tylenol PM, cough medications that cause drowsiness, etc., unless your referring physician is notified and has given you permission. Regular Tylenol, Aspirin, Ibuprofen, etc. is acceptable unless otherwise ordered by your physician.
  • Will I be given any shots, injections or medications during my study?
    No. This is a painless non-invasive procedure. Electrodes will be applied to the scalp, face and legs using a cream affixative. Sensory belts will be used around the chest and abdomen.
  • Will my head be shaved?
    No, shaving is unnecessary on the scalp. Shaving is only necessary on the chest and legs if heavy body hair is present. Shaving a small area where the electrode is placed assures a good reading and less discomfort (from pulling hair) when the electrode is removed.
  • Should I take my usual over-the-counter or prescription drugs before my sleep study?
    Please discuss this with your doctor. Don’t take over-the-counter medications that cause drowsiness, such as Tylenol PM or cough medications unless your referring physician is
    notified and has given you permission.
  • Can I get up to use the bathroom before the study?
    Of course! The technologist will show you what to do if you need to get up during the night or, you may ask the technologist to assist you at that time.
  • Will I be able to go directly to work following my sleep study?
    Most sleep studies are completed by 6 am. Depending on the location of the sleep study, you may need to return home to shower before going to work. Most patients leave the sleep centers no later than 7 am.
  • How will I get my results following my sleep study?
    The sleep data is scored or analyzed by a senior technologist, interpreted by a sleep specialist and sent to your ordering physician. Your physician will provide your results and recommend the most appropriate treatment plan for you. At IIS, we believe this should be completed within a week, but may take just a little while longer. If your health is at risk, we don’t want you to wait weeks for results and treatment.
  • What are some of the possible treatments for a sleep disorder?
    If you are diagnosed with sleep apnea, the most effective treatment is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). This is an airway pressure device that sits on your bedside table with a connecting hose and mask. The mask is positioned over your nose and held in place by a small strap that wraps around your head. The CPAP unit provides gentle air pressure through your nasal passage to keep your airway open while you sleep. Other treatments for this and other disorders may include: improved sleep hygiene, medications, dental appliances, ENT surgery, lifestyle changes, weight loss programs, and sometimes a combination of several to optimize effectiveness.

Unattended at Home/Home Sleep Test

  • What is the difference between an In-lab test and a Home Sleep Test?
    A system with a higher number of channels collects more data. A home sleep test can have as few as one or two channels, or as many as seven or more. In comparison, IIS records at least 12 channels of information during an overnight sleep study, which can detect a wide variety of sleep disorders. A home sleep test collects less information about your sleep and only detects OSA. It also has a higher risk of error. But for some people a home sleep test may be nearly as effective at detecting OSA as an overnight sleep study.
  • Who gets the Home Sleep Test?
    A home sleep test is for people who are at risk for OSA. Home sleep tests are not used to detect other sleep disorders. Key risk factors for OSA include loud and frequent snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity and witnessed pauses in breathing during sleep. Home sleep tests are not recommended for children.
  • What happens when I have it?
    If you are going to do a home sleep test, then you will receive the equipment and instructions that you need. You should ask any questions you may have about how to operate the recording system. You also should find out when and how you need to return the equipment.

    At home you should carefully read any instructions or user manuals that you received with the recording system. Shortly before your normal bedtime, complete the set up of the equipment. Follow the instructions to ensure that the system functions properly. Then get in bed and go to sleep.

    At your normal wake time, remove the sensors according to the instructions. Then return the recording system to your doctor’s office.

  • Who reads the Home Sleep Test?
    The home sleep test records your body’s activity during sleep. At IIS, both a trained sleep technologist and a board-certified sleep specialist will review the data. The technologist will edit the computerized scoring and chart your stages of sleep. Then he or she will look for any events of abnormal breathing. Finally, the sleep technologist will prepare a summary report for the doctor.
  • How do I get the results?
    Your doctor will discuss the results of the home sleep test with you. A “positive result” is a strong indication that you have OSA. In this case the doctor will develop a treatment plan for you. It is possible for a home sleep test to produce a “false-positive result.”

    A “negative result” may indicate that you do not have OSA. But home sleep tests can produce a negative result even when you have OSA. This is called a “false negative result.” About 10 percent of people with OSA are likely to receive a false-negative result. This can occur for a variety of reasons. One common cause is data loss. Critical data may be lost if the equipment malfunctions or is set up improperly.

  • Will my insurance cover my sleep study?
    Most major insurance companies, as well as Medicare, provide coverage for sleep studies. As with any medical procedure, it is a good idea to verify coverage with your insurance company before scheduling a sleep study appointment.
  • Should I take my usual over-the-counter or prescription drugs before my sleep study?
    Please discuss this with your doctor. Don’t take over-the-counter medications that cause drowsiness, such as Tylenol PM or cough medications unless your referring physician is notified and has given you permission.

Attended at Home/Remotely Attended Sleep Study

  • What is a Remotely Attended Sleep Study?
    Rather than being administered in the lab/sleep center, a RASS is administered to a patient in their own home. It is a simple, painless overnight procedure that monitors your brain waves, muscle activity, leg movements, heart rhythms and other body functions while you sleep. It is monitored by a highly-skilled sleep technologist who can hear and see you all night long, but whom you’ll only hear if necessary.
  • Will I need to take time off of work for a sleep study?
    This should not be necessary. A patient’s study usually begins in the evening and is completed before 7am enabling the patient to go to work following the sleep study. If you work a night shift or unusual hours, we will make arrangements for the study to be conducted during your normal sleep hours.
  • Will my insurance cover my sleep study?
    Most major insurance companies, as well as Medicare, provide coverage for sleep studies. As with any medical procedure, it is a good idea to verify coverage with your insurance company before scheduling a sleep study appointment.
  • How should I prepare for my sleep study?
    Before bedtime, follow your physician’s directions concerning prescription medications and please take a shower and wash and dry your hair to remove all of the natural oils and dry skin from your body. Avoid applying makeup or using any hair products, as electrodes will be applied to your face and scalp, requiring it to be clean.
  • What should I wear?
    Please wear loose fitting clothing, preferably pajamas with top and bottom or shorts and a T-Shirt. For liability reasons we can’t allow patients to sleep in the nude or in their undergarments.
  • Is there anything I shouldn’t do?
    • Please avoid alcohol, caffeine and napping the day of the study.
    •  Try to avoid using all hair products except shampoo the day of the study.
    •  Please avoid the use of makeup, ointments, and lotion the day of study.
    •  Don’t take over the counter medications, such as Tylenol PM, cough medications that cause drowsiness, etc., unless your referring physician is notified and has given you permission. Regular Tylenol, Aspirin, Ibuprofen, etc. is acceptable unless otherwise ordered by your physician.
  • Will I be given any shots, injections or medications during my study?
    No. This is a painless non-invasive procedure. Electrodes will be applied to the scalp, face and legs using a cream affixative. Sensory belts will be used around the chest and abdomen.
  • Should I take my usual over-the-counter or prescription drugs before my sleep study?
    Please discuss this with your doctor. Don’t take over-the-counter medications that cause drowsiness, such as Tylenol PM or cough medications unless your referring physician is notified and has given you permission.
  • Can I get up to use the bathroom before the study?
    Of course! The technologist will tell you what to do if you need to get up during the night or.
  • How will I get my results following my sleep study?
    The sleep data is scored or analyzed by a senior technologist, interpreted by a sleep specialist and sent to your ordering physician. Your physician will provide your results and recommend the most appropriate treatment plan for you. At IIS, we believe this should be completed within a week, but may take just a little while longer. If your health is at risk, we don’t want you to wait weeks for results and treatment.
  • What are some of the possible treatments for a sleep disorder?
    If you are diagnosed with sleep apnea, the most effective treatment is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). This is an airway pressure device that sits on your bedside table with a connecting hose and mask. The mask is positioned over your nose and held in place by a small strap that wraps around your head. The CPAP unit provides gentle air pressure through your nasal passage to keep your airway open while you sleep.
    Other treatments for this and other disorders may include: improved sleep hygiene, medications, dental appliances, ENT surgery, lifestyle changes, weight loss programs, and sometimes a combination of several to optimize effectiveness.